We have listed many of these crimes of below; however, we encourage you to visit the link provided below to see all of the crimes included in this definition.

You are NOT responsible for knowing exactly what criminal law the abuser violated.

* Alaska Statute § (3)This section defines domestic violence for the purposes of getting a protective order.

According to Alaska law, domestic violence is when a household member commits or tries to commit one or more of approximately 64 crimes against you or against another “household member.”* NOTE: A household member does not have to live with you.

For the legal definition of household member, see Who can file for a domestic violence protective order? id=475&state_code=AK&open_id=10882#content-3560] We have listed many of these crimes of below; however, we encourage you to visit the link provided below to see all of the crimes included in this definition.

A domestic violence protective order is a civil order that protects you from abuse by a "household member," including relatives and dating partners.

id=475&state_code=AK&open_id=all&lang=en This section defines domestic violence for the purposes of getting a protective order.

According to Alaska law, domestic violence is when a household member commits or tries to commit one or more of approximately 64 crimes against you or against another “household member.”* Note: A household member does not have to live with you.

For the legal definition of household member, see Who can file for a domestic violence protective order?

Examples of the crimes include (but are not limited to): * A CRIME (OFFENSE) AGAINST THE PERSON, which includes approximately 46 separate crimes such as: * murder, including murder of an unborn child; * manslaughter; * reckless endangerment; * human trafficking; * kidnapping, including parental kidnapping (also called custodial interference); * sexual offenses, including sexual assault, incest, and online enticement of a minor; and * robbery, extortion or coercion.

* BURGLARY, generally described as when a person enters or remains unlawfully in a building or dwelling with the intent to commit a crime, with or without a weapon.

* CRIMINAL TRESPASS, generally as described as when a person remains unlawfully on land (with or without the intent to commit a crime) or in a dwelling without intent to commit a crime.