Copyright © 2011 The Apache Software Foundation, Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0.Apache, Apache Subversion, and the Apache feather logo are trademarks of The Apache Software Foundation.Subversion and the Apache Subversion logo are registered trademarks of The Apache Software Foundation. Several companies (Collab Net, WANdisco, Visual SVN, elego, ...) pay or have payed the salaries of some full-time developers, but the software carries an Apache License which is fully compliant with the Debian Free Software Guidelines.

The Subversion client will run anywhere APR runs, which is most places.

The Subversion server (i.e., the repository side) is the same, except that it will not host a Berkeley DB repository on Win9x platforms (Win95/Win98/Win ME), because Berkeley DB has shared-memory segment problems on Win9x.

FSFS repositories (introduced in version 1.1) do not have this restriction; however, due to a limitation in Win9x's file-locking support, they also don't work in Win9x.

Most other projects probably would have called the product "1.0" much earlier, but we deliberately decided to delay that label as long as possible. Such limitations are always documented in the release notes of our releases.

We were aware that many people were waiting for a 1.0 before using Subversion, and had very specific expectations about the meaning of that label. The client and server are designed to work as long as they aren't more than one major release version apart. Our client/server interoperability policy is documented in the "Compatibility" section of the Subversion Community Guide.

All modern flavors of Unix, Win32, Be OS, OS/2, Mac OS X.

Subversion is written in ANSI C and uses APR, the Apache Portable Runtime library, as a portability layer.

The Subversion development community cares deeply about its stability and robustness.

Subversion has been in development since 2000, and became self-hosting after one year.

A year later when we declared "alpha", Subversion was already being used by dozens of private developers and shops for real work.

After that, it was two more years of bugfixing and stabilization until we reached 1.0. However, if the client and server versions don't match, certain features may not be available.